My First House Before And After

If you’ve read my about page, you’ll know that in August 2019 I sold my first house. This is the story of that purchase and sale. When I first got it, I had no intention of even trying to sell it. But boy am I glad I did, it opened my eyes into the opportunities that lie within property development. So without further ado, here is the story of my first house, before & after.

My First House Before And After

I bought the house in March 2018, roughly a year and a half before selling it. It was the perfect buy for me at the time. I managed to get a great deal on it, negotiated the vendor down from 160K asking price down to 144K. The whole place needed gutting and renovating though, I had a project on my hands. My first ever real DIY project at that too. I’d never taken anything on of this scale before! (The most I’d ever done was build IKEA furniture!)

The learning curve was steep and I made some mistakes along the way. Luckily for me, I had my Dad to come and point me in the right direction and help me do some of the more difficult work. It’s always good to have someone to learn from when you’re just starting out, and if that fails – Google and YouTube have an abundance of material too.

I’ll break the post down in stages – showing the transformation of before & after, as well as what work was involved in each “area”. At the end, the juicy bit – I’ll break down the finances involved. I hope you find it useful, and if you’re just starting out on your own first house – enjoy! It’s an unforgettable experience.

The Front Of The House

For those of you who are familiar with the blog, you’ll recognise these two pictures of the front of the house. That’s because I wrote about them in an earlier article – Emphasise Picture Quality When Selling Your House.

In that article, I said that not a great deal had changed here. And it’s True. Apart from a few minor touch ups to give it more curb appeal, the biggest difference is in the way the photo was taken.

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The Before and After Details:

  • New House Number Sign, approx. £10
  • Driveway power wash. £ N/A (Already had the power washer)
  • Fence paint £40
  • Hanging baskets: £30
  • Front door plant pots: £30
  • Replace missing bricks on wall (out of camera shot), bricks found on property, only cost of cement = £20.

Sum of front costs = £130.

The Back Garden

The back garden was huge! Honestly, If access wasn’t an issue there would have been plenty of space to build another house on the back. A great garden to raise a family in. There was no garage as such, just three (rather tired and ugly looking) asbestos built outbuildings. Getting rid of these was priority number one. Outside of that, it was just a general “sprucing” up of the area.

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The Before and After Details:

  • Emptying of outbuildings, cost of 8yd skip = £220
  • Removal of Asbestos outbuildings (I payed for specialist removal here) = £960
  • Powerwashing the pavers £ N/A
  • Fence Paint £80
  • One outbuilding kept for garden equipment, re-felted the roof £50
  • Bedding flowers £50
  • Fence panel replacement (post sale) £400

Sum of back garden costs = £1,760.

The Kitchen

The heart of every good home, the kitchen. The only downside with this space was the footprint, it was quite a small and narrow kitchen.

The keen sighted of you will notice that there’s only full size units on one side, the other side has wall units so you don’t make the floor space feel too claustrophobic (a good way of maximising space if you’re faced with narrow kitchens in the future).

There was a lot of work involved here, I wanted the space to feel right. Both for myself, to make it practical and a nice place to be. But also at some future point in time when it came to selling it (everyone pays special attention to the kitchen). Little did I know, the selling part came a lot sooner than I anticipated!

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The Before and After Details:

  • Remove all old kitchen units, flooring, radiator & wall tiles, cost of a skip = £ Shared with other rooms
  • Re-wiring for new sockets & lights, costs inclusive in house re-wire. = £ Covered Later
  • Dot and dab plaster boarding (where taking the tiles off damaged wall underneath) = £50
  • Remove ceiling wallpaper (this stuff was on with super glue I swear, awful job) = £N/A
  • Re-skim plaster walls and ceilings = £360 (paid for professional)
  • Replace the glass in windows (glass had blown) = £190 (paid for professional)
  • Paint the walls = £25
  • Kitchen Suite (B&Q) exc. Washing Machine (This was my own) = £1,600
  • Tiling = £300
  • Blinds = £120
  • Flooring = £105
  • Interior Door, Handle & Paint = £70.

Sum of kitchen costs = £2,820 + excluded shared items.

The Dining Room

The next on the list was the dining room. This was a big old space and actually, even bigger than the lounge!

I think at some point in time in the past it used to be separated off with a coal store or toilet on one side. There’s an RSJ (visible in the after picture) that took the place of what looks like used to be an old wall. The floor underneath was also different – it went from a concrete slab onto floor boards.

Anyway, you’re probably not interested in that! Getting the dining room done was fairly simple – the main issue had here was the old back boiler behind the fireplace. That needed to come out and be replaced by a new combi-boiler.

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The Before and After Details:

  • Remove & dispose of all units, carpets & curtains. Cost of a skip = £ Shared with other rooms
  • Removal of Back Boiler & Fire Place = £Included within plumbers cost
  • Re-plumbing of radiator pipes = £included within plumbers cost
  • Re-wiring, lights & new consumer unit = £included within electrician cost
  • Room painting = £40
  • Blinds = £120
  • Flooring = £360
  • x2 Interior Doors, Handles & Paint = £140

Sum of dining room costs = £660 + excluded shared items.

The Living Room

This was a nice snug room. It was actually my make-shift bedroom for a little while when I first moved in and started work on the upstairs. A good little spot to retire to after a busy long day.

Working on this space was fairly simple. The biggest job involved was the swapping out of the fireplace. Outside of that it was mostly decorative stuff.

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The Before and After Details:

  • Remove & dispose of all units, carpets & curtains. Cost of a skip = £ Shared with other rooms
  • Removal Gas Fire Place = £Included within plumbers cost
  • Re-plumbing of radiator pipes = £included within plumbers cost
  • Re-wiring & lights = £included within electrician cost
  • Room painting (including shelves & cabinets) = £50
  • Blinds = £150
  • Flooring = £255
  • New Electric Fireplace = £100
  • Interior Door, Handles & Paint = £70

Sum of living room costs = £625 + excluded shared items.

The Bathroom

Ah, the bathroom! The second most important room in the house. I really enjoyed doing this room actually, but there was a lot of work involved – but a lot of valuable lessons I took away too. The first place I ever put my plumbing skills to the test!

I opted to go for these cladding sheets rather than tiles, I have to say they were very fiddly to work with though. I’ve used them again in one of the bathrooms of my current house but I think from now on I’ll be using tiles.

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The Before and After Details:

  • Remove & dispose of bath, toilet, radiator, sink & wooden units. Cost of a skip = £ Shared with other rooms
  • Re-plumbing of water pipes = £included within plumbers cost
  • Re-wiring & lights = £included within electrician cost
  • Bathroom suite – toilet, bath, sink, taps, shower, screen, radiator = £450
  • Tile-look cladding, adhesives & trims = £585
  • Flooring = £80
  • Interior Door, Handles & Paint = £70

Sum of bathroom costs = £1,185 + excluded shared items.

The Bedrooms

The three bedrooms, I’ve grouped these all together as the works were all fairly similar. They were all mostly decorative except from the master bedroom which was a little more involved as I removed the old wardrobe pictured in the “Before” picture.

The Master Bedroom: The footprint of this room was huge, if I wasn’t there on my own I think I would have been tempted to put an en-suite in that room. It would have fit no problem and I could have quite easily used the existing pipework from the family bathroom. But alas, I didn’t need to.

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The Before and After Details:

  • Remove old furniture, carpets & wardrobe at the back of the room. Cost of skip = £shared with other rooms.
  • Re-plumbing of radiator pipes = £included within plumbers cost
  • Re-wiring & lights = £included within electrician cost
  • Room painting = £40
  • Blinds = £120
  • Flooring = £250
  • Sort the walls & ceiling out (from where old wardrobes were removed) = £200
  • New door handles for built in wardrobe (out of shot) = £10
  • Interior Door, Handles & Paint = £70

Sum of master bedroom costs = £690 + excluded shared items.

The Double Bedroom: This room was simpler to do than the master. I decided to leave the built in wardrobes in this one (they looked a bit more modern than the previous ones).

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The Before and After Details:

  • Remove old furniture & carpets. Cost of skip = £shared with other rooms.
  • Re-plumbing of radiator pipes = £included within plumbers cost
  • Re-wiring & lights = £included within electrician cost
  • Room painting = £40
  • Blinds = £80
  • Flooring = £130
  • New door handles for built in wardrobe = £40
  • Interior Door, Handles & Paint = £70

Sum of double bedroom costs = £360 + excluded shared items.

The Single Bedroom: This was quite possibly the simplest room to do. It was literally a case of just taking the old stuff out, repainting and putting new stuff in.

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The Before and After Details:

  • Remove old furniture & carpets. Cost of skip = £shared with other rooms.
  • Re-plumbing of radiator pipes = £included within plumbers cost
  • Re-wiring & lights = £included within electrician cost
  • Room painting = £20
  • Blinds = £80
  • Flooring = £75
  • Interior Door, Handles & Paint = £70

Sum of single bedroom costs = £245 + excluded shared items.

Additional Shared Spends:

In a couple of places above i’ve mentioned a few things that weren’t quite right to attribute to one room in particular as they were more better spread over the full house. A full list of these expenses can be found below.

The Before and After Details:

  • x2 Skips used for the interior of the house = £440
  • Full house re-wire & consumer unit (I used a professional for this) = £4,500
  • New boiler & re-plumbing of all radiator pipes (I used a professional for this) = £3,600
  • New Front Door (Composite) (professionally fitted) = £885

Sum of other additional costs = £9,425.

The Finances

Well that’s the detailed account of the transformation of each room done for you. What about total cost of the project, and more importantly – how much did I make when I sold it?

(Note, the purchase was made with a mortgage – I’ve not included these fees as it was a residential mortgage for own home. If you’re looking at doing this for your own property you may need to account for this. The same applies to stamp duty, I’ve put this according to what I paid (as I was buying my only home). If you’re buying a second property you’ll need to account for surcharge costs – see “Property Tax For Beginners” for more details).

Purchase Costs:

Description:Cost:
Cost to purchase property:£144,000
Solicitors fees (on purchase): £800
Stamp duty:£380
Total Cost of Purchase:£145,180

Renovation Costs:

Description:Cost:
Front of house:£130
Back garden: £1,760
Kitchen:£2,820
Dining Room:£660
Lounge:£625
Bathroom:£1,185
Master Bedroom:£690
Double Bedroom:£360
Single Bedroom:£245
Sum of Additional Costs:£9,425
Total Cost of Renovation:£17,900

The Profit Calculation:

Description:Cost:
Total Cost of Purchase:£145,180
Total Cost of Renovation: £17,900
Cost of Sale (Solicitors):£1,000
Cost of Sale (Estate Agents):£2,000
TOTAL COSTS:£166,080
PROCEEDS OF SALE:£212,000
PROFIT FROM SALE:£45,920

Summary

And there we have it.

The story which opened my eyes to the opportunities that lie within property development. I never bought this place with an intention of making a profit. I just saw a house at a bargain price and thought I’d try turning my hand to doing it up. In my eyes, it would be a cost effective way to get a house I wanted for a bargain price!

So, I decided to sell after an unfortunate incident when it was burgled whilst I was on holiday. After that, I kind of lost any desire to live there really – so I decided to sell (more on that on my about page).

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading this as much as I’ve enjoyed pulling it together. If you’re teetering on the edge of whether to get into property or not, well – I hope this helps you make that decision one way or the other.

All the best,

Chris

Note: The pictures used in this post are taken directly from the old Rightmove advertisements.

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